Nonfiction Book Cover Designer

Check out our brand new site for nonfiction and spiritual book cover design at Nonfiction Book Cover Designer. There are special package prices for book cover design, interior formatting and website design. Self-publishing authors and publishers can still go through Book Cover Express, but the new site makes it easier to focus resources and manage teams dedicated to the specific needs of nonfiction and spiritual book publishers.

Book Cover Design: Don’t Take My Word For It

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by Cathi Stevenson I’ve been a book cover designer for more than 15 years and I’ve created over 2,000 book covers for traditional and indie publishers. If there’s one thing I’ve learned along the way, it’s that book cover design is subjective — very subjective. I can share my experiences with clients. I can tell them what worked in the past. I can explain what I’ve learned through hours and hours and hours of research, and looking at best sellers’ lists and losing myself for entire mornings in bookstores. But, at the end of the day, determining what cover style or trend is the best, is still subjective. The client likes what the client likes. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing, but it might be a bit narrow-minded. A book cover shouldn’t simply reflect the tastes of the author. Its purpose is not to be the prettiest picture on the … . . . Read more

Book Cover Design Award

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by Cathi Stevenson A submission into the e-Book Cover Design Awards competition landed Book Cover Express an award for the design of Stan Levenson’s The Essential Fundraising Guide for K-12 Schools. Stan was an awesome client to work with, easy going, smart, responsive. The challenge with his cover design was that I had to make it stand out in its genre, but needed it to appeal to teachers who worked with students from kindergarten through high school. It was difficult to find good stock images with children covering those age ranges, and pictures of things that might represent a first-grader’s life, rarely work to represent a teenager on the verge of becoming an adult. The solution was to go with no image, and simply use colour to catch the reader’s eye.